Employee Copyright Agreement Achieved Legitimate Aim

Many employers require their staff to sign copyright agreements by which they give up their intellectual property rights to designs or other works created in the course of their employment. In an important decision concerning a luxury leather goods manufacturer, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) ruled that one such agreement was a proportionate means of… Read more »

Court of Appeal Rules Uber Drivers Are Workers

The Court of Appeal has ruled that drivers who use online taxi company Uber’s app are ‘workers’ within the meaning of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA), rather than self-employed contractors, but has given the company permission to appeal to the Supreme Court. Uber provides booking and payments services via the app. A group of… Read more »

Staff Christmas Parties – Don’t Take Unnecessary Risks!

A Christmas party is a chance for staff to relax and enjoy each other’s company. It’s also a wonderful opportunity for employees to celebrate their achievements over the last year and for you to thank them for all their hard work. However, it’s important to take care to ensure they don’t expose your business to… Read more »

The Rules on Time Limits for Employment Tribunal Claims

An employee wishing to bring an unfair dismissal claim must do so within three months of their effective date of termination. Time limits for presenting claims to the Employment Tribunal (ET) are normally strictly enforced. If the deadline is missed, Section 111(2) of the Employment Rights Act 1996 (ERA) states that the claim will only… Read more »

Employers – Are You Treating Misconduct Cases Consistently?

Some forms of workplace misconduct may appear so serious as to obviously justify dismissal as a matter of common sense. However, as an instructive decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) showed, the need for even-handed fairness and consistency is a constant in every employment case, no matter how grave (Doy v Clays Limited). The… Read more »

Whistleblowing – Information or Allegation?

In Cavendish Munro Professional Risks Management Limited v Geduld, the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) established the principle that, for the purposes of the whistleblowing provisions of the Employment Rights Act 1996, to qualify for protection a disclosure must be the giving of information as distinct from an allegation. In the recent case of Kilraine v… Read more »

Vicarious Liability

The Supreme Court has ruled in two cases that dealt with the vicarious liability of employers for incidents that took place at work. Employee’s Extreme Acts In the first case (Mohamud v Wm Morrison Supermarkets plc) the Supreme Court upheld a damages claim brought by Ahmed Mohamud, an innocent customer who suffered serious head injuries… Read more »

Risk Assessments for Breastfeeding Mothers

EU Directive 92/85/EEC is aimed at protecting the health and safety of women in the workplace who are pregnant, have recently given birth or are still breastfeeding. Under UK law as it currently stands, an employer need only undertake a risk assessment specific to the work of a new mother who is breastfeeding if it… Read more »